How To Use Your PM4

Target Training

Target TrainingTarget Training is similar to Darts in that the object of the game is to hit as many bull’s-eyes as possible by maintaining a consistent pace and tempo. Target Training differs by allowing you to set your targets for pace and tempo. Target Training offers two modes of play:

  • Just Play: An open-ended target training session that allows you to row or ski for as long as you want. Like the Darts game, the target pace will be based on your recent strokes.
  • Advanced: You set the constant target pace and tempo you want before the game starts.
    • Coaches: You can set the workout for your athletes and see who gets the best score.
    • Athletes: You can do your favorite steady state workout with the added incentive of achieving your best score!
    • If weight loss is your target, your routine should include long steady workouts—exactly the type that this game promotes.
    • If you are rehabbing from injury, you can use this game to help maintain the pace specified by your physical therapist.

Just Play: At the beginning of each game you will be asked to take five strokes. This sets your pace and stroke rate for the first few darts; after that, your target pace and stroke rate will be based on your most recent strokes. If you quicken your pace and stroke rate during the game, your dart will fly high of the target; if you slow your pace and stroke rate, your dart will fly low. Hit the bull’s-eye by maintaining a consistent pace and stroke rate.

Advanced: This is the same as Just Play except that you set the duration, pace per 500m and stroke rate before each game. Before scoring begins, you will be asked to pull five strokes. These allow you to get into the target pace and tempo specified during game setup.

In either mode of play, the number of points earned depends on where each dart hits the target:

  • Bull’s-eyes are worth 5 points each.
  • The next three rings out from the bull’s-eye are worth 3, 2, and 1 point, respectively.

Your score is given as a percentage of the best possible score obtainable. A perfect score is 100%.