12 Erg and Body Weight Workouts

Mar 20, 2020

As much as we all love our Concept2 equipment, sometimes we want to mix in other movements. Concept2 employees wrote up a few of their favorite body weight workouts—no other equipment needed besides your favorite Concept2 machine. Some of these workouts may list a specific erg as the ideal one for that workout, but any of them—a RowErg, SkiErg or BikeErg—can be substituted or combined for any of the workouts below. Continue Reading ›

8 Erg Workout Ideas for Kids

Mar 19, 2020

If you have an erg, and kids, there are many fun ways to get those kids active at home. Here are a few of our favorite workouts, suitable for all ages. We also offer suggestions for setting up the RowErg for kids.

  1. Music makes working out fun. Put on your favorite song(s) and take turns rowing, skiing or riding to the beat. Try to match the rhythm of the song. You can try working harder through each chorus or row every other song. (Pop songs tend to be about three minutes long each. Add stretches and additional exercises as you rest.)
  2. Draw a pyramid. What does it look like? Try a “pyramid workout”. Why is it called a pyramid? Workout: 100m row / 1:00 rest / 200m row / 1:00 rest / 300m row / 1:00 rest / 400m row / 1:00 rest / 300m row / 1:00 rest / 200m row / 1:00 rest / 100 row. Continue Reading ›

Getting your Erg in Shape

Mar 18, 2020

Like many of us these days, you are probably spending a lot of time indoors, hunkering down and navigating the "new normal" in these days of Coronavirus. We've been hearing from people who are pulling out their ergs so they can stay healthy and active during this time at home. There are few easy things you can do to ensure your machines are fully functioning and ready to go. Continue Reading ›

The Rowing Finish: How Much Layback is Ideal and Why

Mar 10, 2020

At the finish of the rowing stroke, the upper body is leaning back slightly, using support of the core muscles. Biceps and back muscles also help to maintain the finish position of the upper body. Legs are extended, stabilized by the contraction of the glutes and the quads. Shoulders are low, wrists are flat, the grip is relaxed, and the handle is pulled in to just below the rib cage.

What do we mean by “leaning back slightly”? In rowing, the backward lean of the upper body is called the “layback”. What is an ideal amount of layback? Is it the same for everyone? What are the determining factors? And why is it important? Continue Reading ›

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